The history of pantyhose, as for stockings, is tied to that of changes in styles of women's hemlines. Before the 1920s, it was generally expected that women would cover their legs in public, including their ankles; and dress and skirt hemlines were generally to the ground. The main exceptions were in sports and entertainment. In the 1920s, fashionable hemlines for women began to rise, exposing the legs to just below the knees. Stockings also came into vogue to maintain leg coverage, as well as some level of warmth. The most popular stockings were sheer hosiery which were first made of silk or rayon (then known as "artificial silk"), and after 1940 of nylon, which had been invented by DuPont in 1938. During the 1940s and 1950s, stage and film producers would sew stockings to the briefs of their actresses and dancers, as testified to by singer-actress-dancer Ann Miller.[3][4] These garments were seen in popular motion pictures such as Daddy Long Legs.
While sales of traditional styles did not recover, the 2000s saw the rise of other specific styles. Fishnet hose, patterns and colors, opaque tights, low-rise pantyhose, footless shapewear, and pantyhose for men (playfully referred to as "mantyhose") all experienced increased sales. In the 2010s, an increasing popularity for form-fitting opaque leggings paired with casual dress (and even some officewear) supplanted the fashion role previously held by pantyhose, although pantyhose remain popular as pair of formalwear.[10][11]
Thong: Giving you the least amount of coverage, a thong has just a strip of fabric in the back to prevent panty lines from showing through clothes. According to Dr. Dweck, they're totally safe as long as they're not too tight. "The right thong with a cotton crotch and non-chafing 'G-string' that fits well is not a problem for those who prefer them," she advises.
Laura Schubert, co-founder of pubic-hair-oil company Fur, says ODDOBODY’s underwear is “perfect” — especially the brief. “It’s a classic,” she says. “I love a classic brief because they are comfortable and easy to wear. The stitching and fabric ensures that they don’t bunch or have weird lines.” Schubert also likes that the brand’s pieces are made of 100 percent cotton, and that ODDOBODY “promotes speaking comfortably about bodies, health, and identity.”
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