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Cora Harrington (a.k.a. the Lingerie Addict), the author of In Intimate Detail: How to Choose, Wear, and Love Lingerie, says that if you want something you can easily find at your local department store, Natori’s Girl Briefs are her favorite “mainstream” underwear (we heard about Harrington’s more obscure picks, too, which are further down this list). “They’re cute. They’re comfy. The Pima cotton means they’re supersoft,” she explains. “Nordstrom includes them in their annual anniversary sale, and my secret tip is to buy discontinued colorways … after all, no one cares what color your underwear is!” Dolley Frearson, co-founder and creative director of High Fashion Home, is another fan of the Natori Girl Briefs. “For everyday underwear, I need it to feel comfortable and breathable,” she says. “I also need it to appear smooth, and not pinch my skin in any place or ride up.” For Frearson, the Natori briefs check all of those boxes. “They will eventually replace almost all of your underwear in your drawer,” she promises.
Former Strategist writer and editor Margaret Rhodes wrote an ode to these high-rise briefs, which she says are like “a warm embrace,” and akin to curling up with a hot-water bottle or a puppy. Part of the Elance’s magic, according to Rhodes, is that “unlike the chic — even slightly sexy — grandma-esque briefs from lines like Araks and Baserange, the plain cotton Elance leaves pretty much everything to the imagination. You don’t wear these undergarments — they wear you. More exactly, they swaddle you.”
The history of pantyhose, as for stockings, is tied to that of changes in styles of women's hemlines. Before the 1920s, it was generally expected that women would cover their legs in public, including their ankles; and dress and skirt hemlines were generally to the ground. The main exceptions were in sports and entertainment. In the 1920s, fashionable hemlines for women began to rise, exposing the legs to just below the knees. Stockings also came into vogue to maintain leg coverage, as well as some level of warmth. The most popular stockings were sheer hosiery which were first made of silk or rayon (then known as "artificial silk"), and after 1940 of nylon, which had been invented by DuPont in 1938. During the 1940s and 1950s, stage and film producers would sew stockings to the briefs of their actresses and dancers, as testified to by singer-actress-dancer Ann Miller.[3][4] These garments were seen in popular motion pictures such as Daddy Long Legs.
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