“A good high-waisted moment can make your butt look like it’s starring in its own ’90s Calvin Klein commercial,” according to former Strategist writer and current Self editor Lori Keong, who says this high-rise Everlane pair will do the trick. “These slide right up to your navel, hug but don’t squeeze your midrange, and don’t lose their shape or bunch up around your hips during the day,” she says. “They flatter your waist and hug your curves, but don’t pinch at the waistline like other elastic briefs or ride up.” They pass the VPL test, too. “You’d have to be really squinting to detect any VPL,” Keong says.
It might be awkward, but this is our last chance, so please don't scroll past this. This Tuesday we humbly ask you to defend Wikipedia's independence. Our 2019 fundraiser will be over very soon. 98% of our readers don't give; they look the other way. If you are an exceptional reader who already donated, we sincerely thank you. If all our readers donated just $2.75 today, Wikipedia could thrive for years. Most people donate because Wikipedia is so useful. If Wikipedia gave you $2.75 worth of knowledge this year, take a minute to secure its future with a gift to the Wikimedia Endowment. Show the volunteers who bring you reliable, neutral information that their work matters. Thank you.
Thong: Giving you the least amount of coverage, a thong has just a strip of fabric in the back to prevent panty lines from showing through clothes. According to Dr. Dweck, they're totally safe as long as they're not too tight. "The right thong with a cotton crotch and non-chafing 'G-string' that fits well is not a problem for those who prefer them," she advises.

Laura Schubert, co-founder of pubic-hair-oil company Fur, says ODDOBODY’s underwear is “perfect” — especially the brief. “It’s a classic,” she says. “I love a classic brief because they are comfortable and easy to wear. The stitching and fabric ensures that they don’t bunch or have weird lines.” Schubert also likes that the brand’s pieces are made of 100 percent cotton, and that ODDOBODY “promotes speaking comfortably about bodies, health, and identity.” 
×