I have been wearing these hose for years. Recently they have become more challenging to locate. Thankfully I found HerRoom! This particular hose wear well, look good (often have positive comments from coworkers and passengers), more comfortable than full compression styles. I highly recommend to anyone who is in the air or on their feet for long hours!
Another pair of high-waist briefs that fall closer to the Araks and Baserange spectrum of comfy-but-chic underwear comes to us from Adele Tetangco, co-founder of Garmentory, who says that she’s a fan of Botanica Workshop’s 100 percent organic, made in the USA pieces. “I prefer underwear that I can’t feel on my body. It has to just feel like an extension of my outfit,” she says. “The Astra high-waist briefs feel like you’re going commando. They’re so comfortable.”
The history of pantyhose, as for stockings, is tied to that of changes in styles of women's hemlines. Before the 1920s, it was generally expected that women would cover their legs in public, including their ankles; and dress and skirt hemlines were generally to the ground. The main exceptions were in sports and entertainment. In the 1920s, fashionable hemlines for women began to rise, exposing the legs to just below the knees. Stockings also came into vogue to maintain leg coverage, as well as some level of warmth. The most popular stockings were sheer hosiery which were first made of silk or rayon (then known as "artificial silk"), and after 1940 of nylon, which had been invented by DuPont in 1938. During the 1940s and 1950s, stage and film producers would sew stockings to the briefs of their actresses and dancers, as testified to by singer-actress-dancer Ann Miller.[3][4] These garments were seen in popular motion pictures such as Daddy Long Legs.
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